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Seed Library at the Milwaukee Area Technical College: Seed Ordering/Receiving

Order Your Seeds - No contact pick up at MATC Mequon campus

**Online Order Form** available for your order of five free mini seed packets from the choices below. One order per household.

Our inventory is ever changing through May 20, so we can spread seeds across the Milwaukee area. Check back to see what's new!

Community drive through pick up begins April 13 at our Mequon Campus. See Pickup Map.

Dates: April 13 through May 20. Rain or shine.

Days/Hours: Tuesdays-10a to noon.  Wednesdays-2 to 4p.  Thursdays-4 to 6p

How:  No contact drive through outdoor curbside pickup.  Masks required when on campus property.  Covid precautions in place.

--A collaboration between the MATC Landscape Horticulture Program and the MATC Mequon Campus Library.

--And a special thank you to the Mini Packet Packing Prowess of our MATC Student Staffers-Oak Creek Campus. We couldn't do it without you!

Beans & Peas

BE-22 Tri-Color Bean Blend

 

Item Details: Add these beans, with their three colors and three lobed leaves to the architectural diversity of your garden and bring the pack, with its three beans and four petaled shape grace the decorate the interior architecture of your home. This is a well-suited mix of 3 high-yielding varieties that produce beans at the same time, making a tri-color bean harvest a breeze! Sow in succession to spread the harvest out a bit.

 

Instructions: Bush snap beans can be directly sown outdoors at recommended spacing after the last spring frost. Sow until 10 weeks before first fall frost at 3-4 week intervals for an abundant supply of fresh beans all summer. Once beans appear on plants, harvest every 1-2 days. Harvest when they are taut and filled out, but before the beans become discernible in the pods.

 

Days to Maturity: 55 days
Planting Depth: 1"
Spacing in Row: 4"
Width at Maturity: 12"

Corn

COR-09 Oaxacan Green Dent Corn

 

Item Details: This variety originated in Mexico where growers would grind its kernels for green flour tamales. This sturdy corn is drought resistant with gorgeous emerald green kernels. An heirloom corn that originated in southern Mexico is gaining in popularity in the U.S., primarily because of the tasty tortillas and tamales its flour makes, and also for its use as a fall-season ornamental.

 

Oaxacan Green Dent (Zea mays) was grown for centuries by the Zapotec Indians where it’s used to make green-flour tamales. It’s traditionally grown with squash and beans, which climb up the corn stalks. Drought-resistant, sturdy, 7-ft. plants produce emerald green kernels on 10-in. ears 75 to 100 days.”

 

Instructions: Plant seeds outdoors when the threat of frost has passed. We recommend you plant them in blocks of three to six rows . Corn is a heavy feeder and does best in well-drained fertile soil with a lot of water and sunlight.
 

Planting Depth: 1”
Germination: 4-21 Days
Plant Spacing: 4”
Row Spacing: 36-48" apart
Sun Preference: Full Sun
Days to Maturity: 75 - 100
Plant Height: 7’

COR-11 Two Inch Strawberry Popcorn Corn

 

Item Details: Small red strawberry-shaped ears are good for popping and gorgeous for fall decorations. Organic. Produces 2-4 ears per stalk. Strawberry shaped ears. Red kernels. Popcorn

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors 1" deep after danger of frost has passed. For good pollination and full ears, plant in blocks of 3-6 rows instead of one long row. Thin seedlings to 8" apart. Corn is a heavy feeder and does best in well-drained fertile soil with plenty of water.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 4-21
Planting Depth: 1”
Spacing in Row: 8"
Spacing Between Rows: 36-48”
Days to Maturity: 100
Height at Maturity: 5-6’
Produces: 2-4 ears per stalk

Edible Flowers & Seeds

EDI-27 Glorious Gleam Nasturtium

 

Item Details: Jewel-hued edible flowers adorn 3'-long trailing vines. In the 18th Century, during his massive botanical naming project, Carl Linnaeus learned that his daughter, Elizabeth, saw flashing when she looked at nasturtium flowers in the evening. Scientists of the day theorized about electricity, phosphorescence, and the paranormal. Linnaeus was content to dub it “The Elizabeth Linnaeus Phenomenon” and leave it at that. You, too, can observe it: it’s an optical illusion caused by the interaction of green and orange in the pale light of dusk.

 

Instructions: Direct sow after danger of frost has passed, spacing them closer together for a ground cover, or further apart if planting them among other annuals. Can also be sown in containers at indicated spacing. Plants are low lying, but spread wide, covering about 2 feet. All parts of the plant are edible and peppery: leaves, flowers and immature seeds. Use flowers immediately after harvest.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 1”
Spacing in Row: 8"
Spacing Between Rows: 8"
Days to Maturity: 60
Height at Maturity: 18”
Width at Maturity: 36"

https://hudsonvalleyseed.com/media/catalog/product/cache/2/image/700x/040ec09b1e35df139433887a97daa66f/t/e/teddy_bear_close_6_1.jpg

EDI-16 Teddy Bear Sunflower

 

Item Details: There weren't always Teddy Bears. While stuffed animals have a long history, it wasn't until 1902 that the Teddy Bear we know today was perfected. Named after Theodore Roosevelt, the bear was toymaker Morris Michtom's homage to a bear Teddy encountered during a hunting expedition. He refused to kill the bear, as it had been trapped and restrained for him, which to Roosevelt felt unsportsmanlike. The bear became known as Teddy's Bear, and the toy captured the pathos of the moment in its soft, cuddly, utterly un-scary form. This sunflower, in turn, is an homage to the toy--and the bear. Its blooms are like plush golden pillows; its stature is diminutive; its appeal to children is universal; and it is kept alive only by the mercy of benevolent humans.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors after danger of frost has passed, or start indoors a couple weeks before frost. Sow 3-4 seeds per foot; thin to indicated spacing once seedlings are established. This dwarf variety only grows to 2-3' high. Requires full sun, only moderate soil and moderate water. Makes a great cut flower.
 

Days to Maturity: 75 days
Planting Depth: 3/4"
Spacing in Row: 12"
Spacing Between Rows: 24"
Height at Maturity: 2-3'

Herbs

HE-17 Anise

 Item Details: One of the oldest known spices in England, first appeared in the Grocers’ Company of London. Added to bread and sausage in Italy for centuries. Wonderful strong licorice flavor. Very easy to grow, similar to dill in habit. Green leaves and white flowers. Wonderful strong licorice flavor. Annual.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors after last frost. Anise needs 120-130 days to mature fully, so plant as early as possible. Prefers well-drained average soil. Harvest seeds when they turn gray and come away from seed heads easily.

 

Sun Preference: Full Sun

Days to Germination: 20-28
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing in Row: Thin to 6-8” apart
Days to Maturity: 120-130

Height at Maturity: 3’

HE-23 Lettuce Leaf Basil

 

Item Details: Amazing size and flavor! Huge 6” leaves that are not only great in size, but also a behemoth in nutrition with huge amounts of vitamin A and more! Great for gallons of pesto, fragrant salads and perfect for making delicious “Lettuce Leaf Basil Wraps”. Productive and beautiful.

 

Instructions: Harvest basil as you need it, taking leaves from the top of the plant first. Try not to harvest more often than once a week. When adding basil to cooked dishes, wait until just before serving for the strongest flavor and best texture.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun and warmth
Days to Germination: 5-14. 10 weeks to harvest
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing in Row: 2". Thin when plants have 4 leaves
Spacing between Plants: 12” after thinning
Days to Maturity: 75
Height at Maturity: 18-24”
Leaf Size at Maturity: 6” long and 4” wide’

HE-07 Thai Basil

 

Item Details: A distinctive basil we love in curries, stir-fries, and more. Though they are the same species, Thai basil and Italian basil have many differences. Thai basil is a more concentrated, spicy flavor, with smaller leaves on sturdy purple stems and a much more compact habit. The plants are highly ornamental, with deep purple flower buds that open in lavender. Widely adapted to a range growing conditions. Grows well in containers too.

 

Instructions:  Direct sow after frost, or start indoors up to 1 month before last frost date. To have fresh basil the whole season, start in succession at one-month intervals. Pinch off tallest growth in order to keep basil from flowering; flavor becomes too strong once in bloom. Good for garden or container plantings.
 

Days to Germination: 5-14 days
Days to Maturity: 65 days
Planting Depth: 1/4"
Spacing in Row: 12"
Spacing Between Rows: 12"
Height at Maturity: 12"

HE-21 Mammoth Long Island Dill

 

Item Details: Beyond its pungent flavor and culinary versatility, dill has a long history of medicinal use. Ancient Egyptians referred to dill as a soother; gladiators believed it imparted courage; churchgoers felt the seeds sparked alertness; and villagers considered dill a protective charm. Originally named Long Island Dill, this tall billowing relative of Queen Anne's Lace and carrots is perfect for edible landscaping, container gardens and, well, pickles, of course! All parts of the plant—leaves, stems, flowers, and seeds—can be used to impart dill flavor to dishes.  

 

Instructions: Direct sow around last frost, or indoors before last frost and then transplant fairly quickly. Succession sow every 3-4 weeks for highest-quality fresh dill leaves all season. For use as a dry herb, harvest before the umbel (Latin for umbrella) flowers form.
 

Sun Preference: Full to Little Sun
Days to Germination: 7-21
Planting Depth: ¼-½"
Spacing in Row: 9-12”
Spacing Between Rows: 24"
Days to Maturity: 65
Height at Maturity: 24-36”
Width at Maturity: 12-18"

HE-02 Common Sage

 

Item Details: The name "sage" comes from the Latin verb salveo, meaning "to heal". This is because the plant is said to be able to heal almost everything. But the word sage also refers to wisdom, and quite often the wisdom of age. Sir John Harington explored this connection in 1607. "But who can write thy worth, O sovereign sage," he wrote. "Some ask how Man can die where thou dost grow" In Latin Salvia takes the name of safety; in English Sage is rather wise than crafty. Sith [since], then, the name betokens wise and saving, we count it nature's friend and worth the having. If you would like to grow wiser with age, grow with sage by your side in the garden. It will return every year: older, wiser, and more generous.

 

Instructions: Start indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost. Sow 1-2 seeds per pot. Keep soil moist but not wet until seeds have germinated. Overwatering can result in damping off; allow the soil to dry a bit between waterings. When seedlings have 1-2 sets of leaves, thin to 1 per pot. Transplant outdoors when plants are 4" high. Can also be grown in containers. Sage prefers full sun and well drained soil. Sage is a short lived perennial that lasts 3-5 years.
 

Days to Germination: 5-10 days
Days to Maturity: 85 days
Planting Depth: 1/4"
Spacing in Row: 12"
Spacing Between Rows: 18"
Height at Maturity: 12"
Width at Maturity: 12"

Melons

MEL-09 Blacktail Mountain Watermelon

 

Item Details: Gorgeous green-black round fruits. Deep scarlet flesh is super sweet, juicy, and crunchy. Perfect for short season areas; also does well in hot humid climates. Bred by SSE member Glenn Drowns in the 1970s when he lived in northern Idaho, where summer nights average 43°F.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors in 12" diameter hills after danger of frost has passed and soil has warmed. Space hills 8' apart in all directions. Can also be started indoors 4 weeks before transplanting out. Watermelons love heat and prefer sandy or light-textured soils.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 1” in 12” diameter hills
Days to Germination: 4-10
Spacing: 8’ apart in all directions
Plant/Thin: to 3-4 seeds per hill
Days to Maturity: 65-75
Weight at Maturity: 6-12 lbs

Natives

NAT-10 Big Bluestem

 

Item Details: The monarch of the prairie, largely responsible for the formation of the famous prairie sod. Once covered thousands of square miles of the tallgrass prairie from the Atlantic Ocean to the Rocky Mountains. In late August purplish flower spikes emerge producing distinctive three-parted seed heads. Lush green plants change color at first frost to an attractive reddish-copper that lasts well into the winter. The grass can be used as a tall border or vertical accent in a garden. Its deep, extensive root system makes it well suited as a utility plant for erosion control and windbreaks. It is also an excellent choice for roadside plantings and other tough sites.

 

Instructions: Perennial. Sow seeds indoors in a warm area (70-85°F). Transplant outdoors after the danger of frost has passed. Seeds can also be directly sown into a weed-free seedbed in late April-June. Tolerant of many soils except consistently wet sites. Withstands drought.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun

Days to Germination: 30, with regular watering

Planting Depth: 1/4-½”

Height at Maturity: 4-7’

Width at Maturity: 2-2.5

NAT-05 Purple Prairie Clover

 

Item Details: Perennial. Attracts butterflies. Herbaceous plant is unbranched. A dense cylindrical spike of flowers top the plant. Flower spike is 1-2″ long and about half as wide. Each purple flower is about ¼” across, with 5 small petals and 5 golden anthers that protrude outward. These flowers bloom together as a flowery wreath at the bottom of the spike, which gradually moves upward at the season progresses. The blooming period occurs from early to mid-summer, and lasts about 1–1½ months. The root system consists of a stout taproot that runs deep into the ground. The seeds travel only a short distance from the mother plant when the cylindrical spikes are shaken by the wind. Excellent in a variety of plantings including rock gardens, sunny perennial borders, native plant gardens or naturalized prairie areas.
 

Instructions: Sow seeds indoors just beneath surface of soil. Transplant outdoors no later than August 1 to ensure good root development. Also easy to grow when direct seeded into a weed- free seedbed in mid-spring to early summer. Very drought tolerant once established.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 10-20
Planting Depth: Just below surface
Spacing Between Rows: 12”
Height at Maturity: 1-3’
Plant Width at Maturity: 1’
Bloom Length/Width: 2”/1”

NAT-11 Yellow/Gray-headed Coneflower

 

Item Details: Perennial. Attracts butterflies. Member of the daisy family. Summer-long bloomer with large yellow flowers that have drooping petals. Gray-head Coneflower flowers surround a brown seedhead that birds eat from if plants are left standing. It is good for erosion control, looks good in mass plantings or in prairie plantings. Naturalizes easily. Grows up right and may be a meter or more in height. The slender, grooved stems have fine, upward pointing hairs, and may branch with a flower on top of each stem. The flowers may have between 5 to 10 petals that droop down toward the stem with a distinct “cone” in the center.

 

Instructions: Seeds can be direct sown in the Fall. Otherwise best results come from a 30 day cold-moist stratification prior to planting. This is because native wildflowers, have a hard coating that helps protect the outer shell from breaking and sprouting too early. Cold Stratification: 1) Soak your seeds for 1-2 hours. 2) Use a paper towel or coffee filter to drain the water. 3) Spread seeds out in a single layer on the paper towel. 3) Wrap a dry paper towel around the damp paper towel to help keep things moist but not too wet (which could become moldy). 4) Place in a ziploc bag and seal. 5) Label the variety and date clearly on the bag. 6) Place in the refrigerator for 1 month before planting. If seedlings start to sprout in the bag in the refrigerator, remove immediately and either plant in the ground or in pots until it’s time to plant outdoors. After the seeds have been stratified, plant them into the soil by gently sprinkling them on the surface of soil and pressing them in firmly.  Then, lightly sprinkle soil on top of them so they are partially covered. It is best to water the area for one to two months after seeding. Seed may revert to dormancy if it does not receive rain or moisture within a certain number of days after planting.

 

Deadhead to prolong blooming. But be sure to leave some seed heads to ripen as Prairie Coneflower are good plants for naturalizing and re-seed themselves when happy. Leave them standing over the winter months to provide a source of seed for seed eating songbirds. Cut back to 1-2” above the ground in early to mid-spring.
 

Sun Preference: Full to partial sun
Days to Germination: 30
Planting Depth: Surface to light dusting of dirt on top
Height at Maturity: 36-60”
Plant Width at Maturity: 24-36" 
Bloom Width: 2-3”

NAT-16 Showy Goldenrod
 

Item Details: Perennial. Pollinator. Erect, usually unbranched, reddish stems occur singly or in clusters. Small, yellow flowers occur in a compact, erect, pyramidal column. A stout stem, smooth below and rough above, bearing a dense, pyramidal or club-shaped, terminal cluster of small yellow flower heads. Tends to bloom a little later than most Goldenrods. For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately.
 
All Goldenrods are an important fall nectar source for many pollinators including the Monarch butterfly, so it is unfortunate that these fall blooming natives are mistakenly blamed for hayfever. The pollen of Goldenrods is large and sticky which sticks to the bodies of visiting insects. Because of this, goldenrod pollen cannot become airborne and can never make its way into your sinuses. The true cause of hayfever is the wind pollinated ragweeds, which broadcast copious amounts of lightweight pollen into the air.
 
Instructions:
Seeds can be direct sown in the Fall, pressing into the surface of the soil since this plant needs light to germinate.. Otherwise best results come from a 30 day cold-moist stratification prior to planting. This is because native wildflowers, have a hard coating that helps protect the outer shell from breaking and sprouting too early.
 
Cold Stratification: 1) Soak your seeds for 1-2 hours. 2) Use a paper towel or coffee filter to drain the water. 3) Spread seeds out in a single layer on the paper towel. 3) Wrap a dry paper towel around the damp paper towel to help keep things moist but not too wet (which could become moldy). 4) Place in a ziploc bag and seal. 5) Label the variety and date clearly on the bag. 6) Place in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. If seedlings start to sprout in the bag in the refrigerator, remove immediately and either plant in the ground or in pots until it’s time to plant outdoors.
 
After the seeds have been stratified, plant them into the soil by gently sprinkling them on the surface of soil and pressing them in firmly.  Then, lightly sprinkle soil on top of them so they are partially covered. It is best to water the area for one to two months after seeding. Seed may revert to dormancy if it does not receive rain or moisture within a certain number of days after planting. After established, prefers drier soil and tolerates drought well.
 

Sun Preference: Full to partial sun
Days to Germination: 45-60
Planting Depth: Pressed into surface of dirt
Spacing Between Rows: 2-3’
Height at Maturity: 1-5’

NAT-08 Indian Grass

 

Item Details: Indian Grass is one of the first warm season grasses to form seeds and they are rich clusters of bronze colored seed. Golden stems and large seed heads provide ample color and texture to plantings and birds will enjoy the seeds come fall.  Plants are wind-pollinated. Indian Grass can be aggressive, spreading by rhizomes, so is not suited for very small landscapes. Different species of grasshoppers and caterpillars will feed on the blades of Indian Grass; in turn these insects are important food sources for upland game birds and song birds, where they will also find ideal nesting habitat in stands of tall, clumping prairie grasses such as Indian Grass. The bright yellow flowers contrast attractively with the blue-gray foliage. The grass stays low most of the year and then gets tall before blooming in early autumn. Works well on slopes to prevent erosion.

 

Instructions: For spring sowing, germination can be encouraged and will happen faster, if seeds are dry stratified. Or sow seed directly in fall. Division of older plants is difficult because of a dense, tangled root system. Don’t cut the grass back in first year of growth. If your garden is small, you may want to deadhead during the fall to prevent excess self-seeding.

 

Dry stratification is a seed pre-treatment in which the seed is subjected to cold temperatures. This simple treatment of keeping the seeds in cold, dry storage helps increase germination rates by imitating a natural winter dormant period. Store the seed in Ziploc bags in a refrigerator. Most warm season prairie grasses and wildflowers require only 30 to 60 days of dry stratification to break seed dormancy.
 

Sun Preference: Sun to partial shade
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing in Row: 2-3’
After Germination Occurs: Is drought resistant
Height at Maturity: 4-6’. Maturity reached year two
Bloom Color: Yellow
Bloom Time: Aug , Sep , Oct
Bloom Notes: The awns are red/rust color
High Deer Resistance
Attracts Butterflies

  

NAT-02  Prairie Blazingstar

 

Item Details: Perennial. Plants usually do not bloom until the second year. One of the most spectacular and majestic of the prairie plants. Large spikes of tightly bunched magenta flowers bloom from the top to the bottom of the stalk. This vertically spiking plant, also known as Gayfeather, unfurls blooms from tip to stem, like a flame descending a sparkler stick. No wonder it is so attractive to so many pollinators: its showy spikes draw in crowds of butterflies, moths, bees, nymphs, and hummingbirds. It is also attractive to humans, who appreciate the ombre tones of the spike as it moves from the bud to flower stage. An excellent cut or dried flower.

 

Instructions: For spring sowing, germination can be encouraged and will happen faster, if seeds are wrapped in damp paper towels, in a plastic bag, and refrigerated for 3-4 weeks. Transplant outdoors after frost in an area where plants can naturalize. Seed can also be directly sown into a prepared seedbed in fall, or in early- to mid-spring. Requires a rich loam, clay, or slightly moist sandy soil. Perennial: Plants usually do not bloom until the second year.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 20-45 days
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing in Row: 18"
Spacing Between Rows: 30"
Days to Maturity: 365. For blooms.
Height at Maturity: 3'-4'
Width at Maturity: 12"

NAT-07 Rattlesnake Master

 

Item Details: Scattered along the stiff, upright stem of this unusual perennial are tough, blue-green, yucca-like, parallel-veined leaves. Smooth, rigid stem bearing thistle-like flower heads made up of small greenish-white florets mingled with pointed bracts. The individual, greenish-white flowers cluster into unique, globular heads at the top of the branch ends. Can be used as an ornamental in a bog or pond area, water garden. Their spiny leaves make walking through clumps of these plants difficult, and also make them unpalatable to grazing livestock. They were once credited with a variety of curative powers. Their flower heads develop a bluish cast with maturity. And despite its muted color, bees and butterflies love it!

 

Instructions: Lightly press seeds into the surface of the soil in fall or late spring. If planting in spring, keep the seed moist until germination. Rattlesnake master can be an aggressive self-seeder. Remove seed heads to keep the plant in check.

 

Perennial
Sun Preference: Full Sun
Soil Description: Various well-drained soils.
Moisture: Dry, mesic
Plant Spacing: 12-24” apart
Height at Maturity: 3-4’
Flowers: ½ - 1” globes
Bloom Color: White, green
Bloom Time: Jul, Aug

NAT-17 Rosinweed

 

Item Details: Perennial. Pollinator. Coarse and sunflower-like. Derives its common name from the resinous gummy sap exuded by broken/cut plant stems. Usually a shorter silphiums. Likes rocky or dry open woods, prairies and glades. It grows on erect, hairy stems sparsely clad with pairs of rough, stalkless, bristly, hairless to woolly, toothed to toothless, medium green leaves. Flowers resemble small sunflowers. Appear in mid-summer. The root system consists of a taproot and short rhizomes, which enable this plant to form clumps. Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates some light shade. Also tolerates some drought once established. Will grow in a variety of soils including sandy, loamy or clay ones. Plants may be slow to establish in the garden, particularly when grown from seed. 

 

Instructions: Seeds can be direct sown in the Fall, pressing into the surface of the soil since this plant needs light to germinate.. Otherwise best results come from a 30 day cold-moist stratification prior to planting. This is because native wildflowers, have a hard coating that helps protect the outer shell from breaking and sprouting too early.

 

Cold Stratification: 1) Soak your seeds for 1-2 hours. 2) Use a paper towel or coffee filter to drain the water. 3) Spread seeds out in a single layer on the paper towel. 3) Wrap a dry paper towel around the damp paper towel to help keep things moist but not too wet (which could become moldy). 4) Place in a ziploc bag and seal. 5) Label the variety and date clearly on the bag. 6) Place in the refrigerator for 30 days before planting. If seedlings start to sprout in the bag in the refrigerator, remove immediately and either plant in the ground or in pots until it’s time to plant outdoors. After the seeds have been stratified, plant them into the soil by gently sprinkling them on the surface of soil and pressing them in firmly.  Then, lightly sprinkle soil on top of them so they are partially covered.

 

It is best to water the area for one to two months after seeding. Seed may revert to dormancy if it does not receive rain or moisture within a certain number of days after planting. After established, prefers drier soil and tolerates drought well. Downy mildew, leaf spots and rust may occur. Plants develop taproots. Once established, division is not recommended.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: Pressed into surface of dirt
Spacing Between Rows: 2-3’
Height at Maturity: 2-6’
Plant Spread: 1-3’
Attracts: Birds, Butterflies

Pollinators

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/1322-flower-mixed-bachelors-buttons.jpg

POL-11 Mixed Colors Bachelor's Button

 

Item Details: For those who cannot stand to just have one color of Bachelor’s Buttons! Plants will bloom throughout the season, great for mass plantings. Extensive range of colors. Long stems are excellent for cutting. Self-seeding hardy annual.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors in the early spring when the soil is still cool and light frost is possible. Can also be sown in the fall just before the ground freezes. Plants will tolerate poor soil. Good cutting flower.
 

Days to Germination: 7-15
Planting Depth: 1/8"
Spacing in Row: 6-12"
Height at Maturity: 2-3'

POL-33 Breadseed Poppy Mix

 

Item Details: Brief beauty, long-lasting health. Gorgeous poppy petals, as thin and delicate as crepe paper, don't last long. The seeds, however, are vessels of endurance. Rich in omega-3s, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, a wide range of vitamins, and all of the essential amino acids, poppy seeds are exceptionally nutritious, contributing to health and, it is said, to longevity. Used in culinary creations all over the world as a spice, condiment, garnish, and dessert base, poppies yield hundreds of thousands of seeds from just a few plants.

 

This mix is taller than the Mother of Pearl Poppy, with bigger seed pods and a longer season of bloom. Colors range from pink to lilac. Includes Elka, Ziar Breadseed, and Black Beauty poppies.

 

Instructions: For best results, winter sow poppy seeds or sow in very early spring in a prepared garden bed. Alternately, start indoors in early spring by pressing the seeds into the soil, but do not cover them. Keep in a cool place. Transplant when small without disturbing the roots. Once flowering, water infrequently.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 7-10
Planting Depth: 0”
Spacing in Row: 18-24". Thin to 12-18”
Spacing Between Rows: 18"
Days to Maturity: 100
Height at Maturity: 48”
Width at Maturity: 18"

Carrots & Beets

CAR-18 Kyoto Red Carrot - For Fall Planting Only

Item Details: This is a Japanese kintoki type (sweet red) carrot. These silky red carrots are grown near Kyoto, Japan, where they are traditionally eaten on the Japanese New Year, often carved into the shape of a plum blossom to represent fertility in the coming year. These carrots have an exceptional texture and sweet flavor. A perfect variety for late summer, fall or winter gardening, the bright red color becomes much darker when grown in the winter. Long tapered roots. (This variety may not do well if planted in the spring.)

 

Instructions: Not for Spring Planting. Direct seed 2-3 weeks before last frost and continue until a month before first frost.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 0-1/4”
Spacing in Row: 2-4”
Spacing Between Rows: 12-18”
Days to Maturity: 70-90
Length at Maturity:  10-12”

CAR-02 MATC House Blend Rainbow Carrots

 

Item Details:  Plant Breeder: University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bred for Organic Systems. These seeds are not commercially available. The goal of breeding the Wisconsin Open Source- OSSI Composite populations was to take commercially available cultivars that had freedom to operate for breeding and create diverse carrot populations based on market class and root color. These composite populations are meant to represent some of the diversity present in commercially available carrot germplasm that is available to use in breeding.These seed populations have been developed for two generations under organic growing conditions. A blend of colorful carrots

 

The WI-OSC Red is characterized by the accumulation of lycopene in the roots, creating an intense red or rose color. Roots are generally ‘Danvers’ or ‘Nantes’ in shape, so there is variation in the definition of the root’s shoulders, as well as the amount of taper in the roots and tips. Some roots are quite tapered while others are more cylindrical. There is variation in smoothness of roots. Some roots are quite smooth but others have very large lenticels or are prone to branching. Parental material included: Atomic Red, Nutri-Red, and Red Samurai.

 

The WI-OSC White is characterized by white colored roots and green shoulders. Roots are generally ‘Belgian’ shaped, with large cylindrical roots and tapered tips. This population has very vigorous tops and large roots. Parental material for this population included: Lunar White, Snow White, White Satin, White Belgian, and White Kuttiger.

 

The WI-OSC Purple population has purple exterior color (anthocyanin accumulation) with a variation of purple, orange, and white interiors. Roots are generally quite large in diameter with a significant taper. Tops are very vigorous. Parental material included: Cosmic Purple , Deep Purple, Dragon, Purple Haze, and Purple Sun. The roots in this population most clearly resemble the Cosmic Purple and Dragon varieties.

 

The WI-OSC Yellow population is characterized by variation in the intensity of yellow color, or accumulation of xanthophylls, in the roots with occasional white and orange roots appearing. Some roots have green crowns. Roots vary in shape and are generally ‘Danvers’ or ‘Belgian’, with relatively pronounced shoulders and tapered roots. Tops are very strong and vigorous. Parental material included: Amarillo, Solar Yellow, Jaune du Doubs, and Yellow Sun.

 

Instructions: Direct sow from mid-April until early August in friable, fertile, deeply worked soil. Choose your least weedy soil for carrots, as they are tricky to cultivate when young; carrots can take 10 days to germinate, and can be quickly choked about by weeds. Thin young carrots seedlings to 2" apart, then thin baby carrots by pulling out every other carrot, allowing the remaining carrots to grow to full size. While good carrots can be grown in any soil, they only grow to supermarket size in loose and deep soils without too many rocks. (Even if strangely shaped or undersized, their flavor and crunch is superior to store-bought.) Fall carrots can be stored in plastic bags in the refrigerator or in a root cellar for months. Do not store fresh carrots with the tops on, they draw water and nutrients from the roots. Rather, remove the tops after harvesting and use to flavor soup stock.

 

Days to Germination: 8-10 days                                                                      
Days to Maturity: 75 days
Planting Depth: 1/4"
Spacing in Row: 1/2”. Thin to 2"
Spacing Between Rows: 12"
Length at Maturity: 4"-8"

Cucumbers & Squash

Photo Courtesy Seed Library Patron - Brandi


CU-01 Lemon Cuke/Cucumber

 

Item Details: Looks like a lemon but tastes like a cucumber! Very productive plants and unusual, beautiful fruits. Perhaps created from an accidental cross or a freak mutation—or picked up by adventurous traveling seed savers—some of the most unusual heirlooms were saved because of their freak factor. This cuke looks like a lemon but tastes like a cucumber—a really good one! Though common in India, it is not often seen in American supermarkets. So: best to grow some yourself. Invite a little oddity into your garden and enjoy the tasty and bountiful results. This unusual cucumber dates back 1894. It is consistently productive and mild, and looks beautiful sliced into rounds.
 
Instructions: Direct sow 2 weeks after last frost, or sow indoors 2-4 weeks earlier and then transplant. Make at least 2 succession plantings of cucumbers to have high-quality fruit for harvest all season. Lemon Cukes are best harvested at lemon-size, though they stay good eating even when slightly larger. The more you harvest, the more the plant produces and the longer the period of yield for each plant.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 3/4-1” in 12” diameter hills
Days to Germination: 5-10
Spacing: 36’ apart in all directions
Plant/Thin: 2-3 seeds per hill. Can thin to 2 plants
Days to Maturity: 65
Height at Maturity: 6"-8"
Length at Maturity: Best when picked lemon sized
Plant Spread at Maturity: 24"

CU-36 North Carolina Heirloom Cucumber

 

Item Details: New in 2020. This flavorful variety produces small, straight, pale-yellow to white fruit with juicy, crunchy, and light-green flesh. The fruits are slightly ridged, measure 1.5-2" long and 3-3.7" wide, and weigh 2-4.5 ounces. Moderately vining plants have distinctly lobed leaves and dense foliage. This prized heirloom was donated to Seed Savers Exchange in the mid-1980s by member Marian Hart and can be traced back to a family that has stewarded it for more than a century in the mountains of North Carolina.

 

Instructions: When growing plants on a trellis, space seed 6-8" apart and thin plants as necessary; train plants to climb the trellis with an initial guidance. Alternatively, make 12" hills at least 6' apart. Plant 6-8 cucumber seeds per hill 1" deep. After germination, thin to 3-4 plants per hill. Can also be started indoors 2-4 weeks before last frost. Cucumbers benefit from steady moisture.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 1” in 12” diameter hills
Spacing: 6’ apart in all directions
Plant/Thin: 3-4 plants per hill
Days to Maturity: 60-70
Size at Maturity: 1.5-2" long and 3-3.5" wide. Weigh 2-4.5 ounces

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/1356-parisian-pickling-cucumber-organic.jpg

CU-07 Parisian Pickling Cucumber

 

Organic. Dark green skin. Used for gherkins.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors in 12" diameter hills after the last frost when soil is warm. Space hills 6' apart in all directions. Can also be started indoors 2-4 weeks before the last frost for an earlier harvest. Cucumbers benefit from consistent moisture. Provide support for vines to save space.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 1” in 12” diameter hills
Spacing: 6’ apart in all directions
Plant/Thin: 3 seeds per hill.
Days to Maturity: 70
Length at Maturity: Used for gherkins

CU-34  Boer Flat White Pumpkin

 

Item Details: Attractive, very flat, pure white pumpkins that are unique and tasty. Very sweet orange flesh is perfect for pies and baking. A wonderful decorating and eating variety that was historically popular in South Africa and was named for the Dutch Boers, who were once the colonial power. We are glad to finally have seeds for this rare treasure.

 

Growing Instructions: Direct sow after frost. Plant in well-fertilized hills of up to four seeds with hills spaced 4' apart. Thin to three plants per hill. At harvest, cure for a week in sun and fresh air, but protect from frost. Cured squash will store all winter.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 1/2 to 1”
Spacing: 4’ apart in all directions
Days to Germination: 6-12
Plant/Thin: Up to 4 seeds per hill. Thin to 2-3 plants
Days to Maturity: 115
Size at Maturity: 10” diameter. 4” height. 10 lbs, up to 20 lbs

CU-08 LONG ISLAND CHEESE PUMPKIN

Superb flavor for pies and soups. Ken Ettlinger grew up on Long Island in the 1950s, where his family would pick up a cheese pumpkin so his mother could make Thanksgiving pie. In the 1970s, Ken noticed that the once common squash—one of the oldest cultivated in America—was becoming a rare find. He didn't want the pies to become just a memory, so he started saving seeds. Due to this local seed steward's efforts and the work of the Long Island Regional Seed Consortium and Glynwood’s Kitchen Cultivars, these pumpkins are here to stay! Linked to cheese through appearance only, the Long Island Cheese Pumpkin has been revered for centuries thanks to its smooth flesh and string-less interior (not to mention the high nutrient content). It's one of the oldest squashes domesticated for food, which we think speaks well for its taste and grow-ability. Choose this cheese-wheel-like squash for your autumn sweets and buck the canned stuff once and for all!

 

Growing Instructions: Direct sow after frost, or start under protection up to 3 weeks before (but no earlier—grows very quickly at this stage). Plant in well-fertilized hills of 4-8 seeds with hills spaced 3' apart. Thin to three plants per hill. Harvest when color is well developed and rind is hard. Cure for a week in sun and fresh air, but protect from frost. Cured squash will store all winter.

 

Days to Germination: 5-10 days
Days to Maturity: 100 days
Planting Depth: 1"
Spacing in Row: 24"
Spacing Between Rows: 72"
Height at Maturity: 24"
Sun Preference: Full Sun

CU-19 Dark Star Zucchini

 

Item Details: For those who love green zucchini, Dark Star is a top pick. Bred through a collaboration of the Organic Seed Alliance and Eel River Farms, with a goal to create an open-pollinated zucchini that is reliably uniform and dark green. This one gives the corporate-owned hybrid zucchini seeds that dominate the seed market a run for their money. Compact form is good for small gardens and its open plant habit makes the squash easy to harvest. Compared to the hybrids, it keeps producing into late summer after the standards have pooped out.


Instructions: Can start indoors 2-3 weeks before last frost or sow outdoors after last frost. As with all cucurbits, squash plants do not like their roots disturbed during transplanting so if starting seeds indoors, best to use biodegradable pots. Squash seedlings are sensitive to damping off fungus so keep seeds on the drier side and use a fan (set to low) to provide air circulation. It is always a good idea to protect seedlings from cucumber beetles and squash bugs by covering them with row cover fabric at planting and leaving it on until plants are flowering. Sow 2-3 more times at monthly intervals for fruit all season. Zucchini tolerates moderate soil fertility and dry conditions. Harvest fruits often at young stage for best eating and highest yields.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 1/2-1” 
Spacing: 3’ apart in all directions
Days to Germination: 4-10
Plant/Thin: 6-8 seeds per hill. Thin to 3-4 plants
Days to Maturity: 55
Plant Size: 3’ height and width

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/1345A-golden-zucchini-squash-organic.jpg 

CU-14 Golden Zucchini

 

Item Details: (C. pepo) Introduced in 1973 by W. Atlee Burpee of Philadelphia, bred from genetic material supplied by Dr. Oved Shifress. This vivid yellow fruit was the first commercial B (bicolor gene) cultivar. Crisp and mild-flavored zucchinis are borne prolifically on bush plants.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors in 12" diameter hills after danger of frost has passed. Can also be started indoors 3 weeks before transplanting out.

 

Days to Maturity: 50-55 days
Planting Depth: 1"
Spacing : 3-4 plants per hill
Spacing Between Hills: Hills 6' apart, 12" in diameter

Grains

 

GR-08 Amaranth Hopi Red Dye

 

Item Details: This variety of amaranth originates with the Hopi Nation, a Native American tribe of the Southwest, who use its flowers as an edible dye. Stunning, beet-red color is eye-catching in any garden. Every life stage of the plant and all above-ground parts are usable: sprouts, micro-greens, baby greens, whole young plants, mature leaves, and seeds are edible. This amaranth is re-seeding, making it ideal for edible landscaping or as a cover crop (watch out – it spreads seed!).

 

Instructions: Sow amaranth seeds directly outdoors after fear of frost. Keep seeds constantly moist until germination.

 

Planting Depth: Scatter on top of soil and pat in. (needs light to germinate) 

Germination: 10-21 Days 

Days to Maturity: 14 days baby, 70 days flowering plant, 110 days seed

GR-01 Cherry Vanilla Quinoa

 

Item Details: Smothered in frothy masses of cream-to-pink flower heads. Dazzling enough for the most elegant border (or illicit, front-yard garden!) but eminently practical, like all quinoas, for greens or grain.

 
Instructions:
The leaves can be used like spinach that provides an abundance of calcium and iron. Cherry Vanilla has particularly tasty baby leaves, so it is an outstanding baby salad green choice. For greens, sow 1 inch apart and harvest entire plant at 6-8 inches tall. For grain production and enjoying selected leaves throughout the season. Blooms in late summer to autumn. 

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 4-10
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing in Row: 12-18" To eat as greens, see Instructions above.
Spacing Between Rows: 24"
Days to Maturity: 90-120
Height at Maturity: 3-5

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/0030-sand-mountain-sorghum-organic.jpg

GR-02 Sand Mountain Sorghum

Item Details: From SSE member Michael Adamson, whose family in northern Alabama has grown this variety since the 1920s. The family uses the cane syrup to make molasses and the grain to make pancake flour. Plants grow 8-10' tall, producing juicy, sweet stalks. Starchy seeds are large and plump. Harvest at 100-120 days for grain, earlier for syrup.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors after danger of frost has passed. Sorghum can self-pollinate; ‘block’ plantings are not necessary for grain production. Thin seedlings to 8" apart. Excessive nitrogen reduces syrup quality.

 

Days to Germination: 14-21
Planting Depth: 1/2-1”
Spacing in Row: 4"
Spacing Between Rows: 30-36"
Days to Maturity: 100-120
Height at Maturity: 8-10”

GR-05 Williams Sorghum

from Seed Savers Exchange

 

Item Details: This heirloom syrup sorghum towers over the garden at 7-9'-tall and produces seed heads with attractive red glumes (and an occasional black glume for added interest). The grain itself is red, plump, and easy to thresh. It was donated to Seed Savers Exchange by Wayne Hayes of Annville, Kentucky, in 2015. Wayne and his family have made syrup from this sorghum cane since 1948. Each plant produces 3-6 tillers.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors ½-1" deep after danger of frost has passed. Sorghum can self-pollinate; ‘block’ plantings are not necessary for grain production. Thin seedlings to 8" apart. Excessive nitrogen reduces syrup quality.

 

Sun Preference: Full Sun

Days to Germination: 4-21

Planting Depth: 1/2-1”. Thin to 8” apart

Spacing in Row: 4”
Spacing Between Rows: 36-48"

Height at Maturity: 7-9’

Lettuce & Greens

GRE-53 Mizuna Asian Greens

 

Item Details: Organic. With its narrow white stems and bright green lacy-edged leaves, this elegant Japanese green has a delicious spicy flavor and a texture similar to arugula, but with a milder taste. As a salad green, Mizuna is best eaten young and can be used as a cut-and-come-again crop, but it is also excellent in stir-fries and soups as plants mature. Harvest leaves as needed or simply pick the whole head.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors after danger of frost has passed to prevent bolting. Can also be planted in late summer for a fall crop.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun to partial shade
Days to Germination: 4-7
Planting Depth: 1”
Spacing in Row: 1"
Harvest/Thin to: 6-12" apart, for mature heads to develop
Spacing Between Rows: 18"
Days to Maturity: 21 days baby greens, 40 days mature heads

GRE-50 Osaka Hardy Mustard Greens

 

Item Details: Osaka Hardy is a Nature & Nurture Farm original. It began with Purple Osaka mustard growing in our hoophouse through 2 polar vortex winters 2014 & 2015 where outdoor temps reached -20°. We saved seeds from the survivors and we are very pleased with the result. Hardier in the cold than traditional ‘Purple Osaka,’ this variety has a diversity of leaf shapes and colors. Leaf colors range from deep purple to green & purple and leaf shape from round to elongated. This variety adds to our collection of cold hardy seeds that don’t need a second layer of protection inside the hoophouse unless temperatures dip below -5°. Others include Grand Rapids lettuce, Abundant Bloomsdale Spinach, and Vit Mache. Great for gardeners with cold frames and low tunnels. As baby greens it adds liveliness (and a touch of spice) to monotone lettuce salad. Larger leaves are cooked as mustard greens.

 

Instructions: Mustard greens can be grown in the spring, summer, and fall, though they prefer an air temperature range of 60 - 75° . Direct sow seeds outdoors 4/15 - 8/30. For baby greens, broadcast sow seeds ½” deep, 60 seeds per square foot. For mature leaves, sow seeds 1” apart in rows 18” apart. Sow every 3 weeks for continuous harvest, or let them re-seed themselves to have low maintenance self-sowing, edible “weeds”. Keep well watered during hot weather. It can grow in part shade. Tolerant of light frosts.

 

To Harvest: Baby greens: cut entire plant when 3 - 6” tall for cut-and-come-again baby greens (cut plant with scissors 1 - 2" above soil level so you don’t damage the growing crown.) Return for several harvests. Harvest mature leaves individually as desired.  Eventually the plants will begin to “bolt” (flower) and make seed.
 

Sun Preference: Part shade to full sun
Days to Germination: 4-10
Days to Maturity: 20 days baby, 40 days full size

GRE-42 Peking Ta Ching Kou Pai Tsai Asian Green

from Seed Savers Exchange

 

Item Details: This prolific, easy-to-grow Asian green is one of Seed Savers Exchange advisor David Cavagnaro’s favorites from his time as SSE’s farm manager. The greens can be prepared like any other brassica greens, such as collards and kale. Growing to more than three feet tall, this variety bears lovely, large purple leaves that have an ornamental quality as well as great taste. 45 days to maturity.

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors after danger of frost has passed to prevent premature flowering. Can also be planted in late summer for a fall crop. Seeds will germinate in 4-7 days. Plant in full sun to partial shade.

Days to Germination: 4 to 7 days
Days to Maturity: 45 days
Planting Depth: 1/4"
Spacing in Row: 1", thin to 6"-12"
Spacing Between Rows: 18"

GRE-15 Tatsoi Asian Green

 

Item Details: (Brassica rapa) Emerald spoon-shaped leaves form a compact rosette. Fast growing and vigorous. Mild flavor gets sharper as the leaves mature. Popular as a baby leaf for salads; also excellent when added to soups or stir-fries. Cut leaves as needed at any stage or harvest the whole head. 21 days baby greens, 45 days.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors after danger of frost has passed to prevent premature flowering. Can also be planted in late summer for a fall crop. Seeds will germinate in 4-7 days. Plant in full sun to partial shade.

 

Days to Maturity: 21 days for baby greens; 45 days to full maturity
Planting Depth: 1/4"
Spacing in Row: 1"; thin to 6" to 12"
Spacing Between Rows: 18"

GRE-46 Dino Kale

 

Item Details: The black-green foliage of this plant is nearly reptilian: deeply hued, rippled, and tough. Despite its rough appearance, it is extremely sweet and tender—a metaphor for our old dog, Kale. It was also Kale’s favorite brassica, as it is for gardeners worldwide, who have given it many names: Lacinato, Cavolo Nero, Tuscan Kale, Palm Tree Kale, and Dinosaur Kale. A consistent, long-season garden companion, Dino Kale will never go extinct as long as you grow it each year.
 

While it isn't quite as cold hardy as its kale cousins, it usually survives most of the winter under a blanket of row cover and snow. The seed we sourced for this particular kale variety was selected after trialing several other sources, and we chose it for it hardiness, vigor, and broad leaves.
Use mature leaves in salads if marinated in an acidic dressing. The flavor is great in pasta dishes, or alone with garlic and olive oil.

 

Instructions: Direct sow Dino Kale about a month before last frost. Or, sow under protection 8 weeks earlier, then transplant about a month before last frost. For a young, tender fall crop, sow 3-4 months before first fall frost. Avoid planting at edge of garden, as slugs love kale and will creep in for nightly dining. Harvest a handful of individual outer leaves from each plant; mature plants will be ready for another harvest in a few days.
 

Sun Preference: Full to partial sun
Days to Germination: 5-10
Planting Depth: 1/2”
Spacing in Row: 18"
Spacing Between Rows: 12"
Days to Maturity: 65
Height at Maturity: 18-36”
Width at Maturity: 18"

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/0624-dwarf-blue-curled-scotch-kale-organic.jpg

GRE-18  Kale, Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch

 

Item Details: Gorgeous finely curled blue-green leaves hold their color even in severe cold. Uniform low-growing plants are 15" tall with a 20-35" spread. Very hardy; will overwinter with mulch in zones 4-5. Ornamental and delicious. High in vitamin A. 53-65 days from transplant.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds indoors ¼" deep. Plant out just before the last frost. Kale is most tender and delicious after a frost. Harvest can continue even after snow.

 

Days to Germination: 3 to 10 days
Days to Maturity: 53 to 65 days from transplant
Planting Depth: 1/4" deep
Spacing in Row: 24" apart for transplants

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/0384-mascara-lettuce.jpg

GRE-29 Mascara Lettuce

 

Item Details: One of the most beautiful varieties in SSE’s collection of over one thousand lettuces. Curly frilled oakleaf-shaped leaves retain their dark red color in hot weather. Mild flavor. Looseleaf. 

 

Instructions: Sow continuously for a constant supply of lettuce. Best grown in cooler weather. Plant in full sun or partial shade.

 

Days to Germination: 7 to 14 days
Days to Maturity: 65 days
Planting Depth: 1/4"
Spacing in Row: thin to 10"

GRE-48 Rocky Top Lettuce Salad

 

Item Details: Very Popular! Our improved formula blend is now better than ever! With more brightly colored and unique lettuces, it makes a flavorful and brilliant salad. A top-selling item for us; our customers just love it! Perfect for better markets or your home table. People love the rich, old-fashioned taste. Includes some non-listed rare varieties. Extraordinary mix of sweet red leaves, delicate leafy greens, and spicy Arugula and Chervil.

 

Instructions: Start indoors 3-5 weeks before last frost. Or sow outdoors after the last spring frost. Yield: Essentially perpetual, because it reseeds itself if left to bolt.

 

Sun Preference: Sun to part shade
Days to Germination: 7-10
Planting Depth: 1/8”. Barely cover. Keep moist
Spacing in Row: 1". Then thin to 6”
Spacing Between Rows: 12"
Days to Maturity: 38-45 in summer. 45-50 in fall
Height at Maturity: 12”
Suitable for container growing: Yes

Okra

OK-04 Clemson Spineless Okra

 

Item Details: An All America Selections winner in 1939, that was introduced by Clemson University. Still the most popular open-pollinated variety on the market. Vigorous plants grow 3-5' tall. Exceptionally uniform, deep green ribbed and spineless pods are best harvested when 3" long. Excellent quality. This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States but does not tolerate cold well

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors when the soil has warmed. Tolerant of heat and drought, but not of cold. Keep well picked for higher yields.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Planting Depth: 1/2”
Spacing in Row: 2". Thin to 6-8”
Days to Maturity: 50-64
Height at Maturity: 3-5’
Length at Maturity: 3”

https://www.seedsavers.org/site/img/seo-images/0643-star-of-david-okra-organic.jpg

OK-02 Star of David Okra

 

Item Details: (aka Old Fashioned Okra) Tall 7' plants have purple coloration on leaves and thick pods that are best picked at about 3" long. Cross-sections of pods look like the Star of David, giving this variety its name. Like many okra varieties, this plant bears beautiful flowers and foliage that could warrant a place in the ornamental border.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds outdoors when the soil has warmed. Tolerant of heat and drought, but not of cold. Keep well picked for higher yields.

 

Days to Maturity: 60-75
Planting Depth: 1/2"
Spacing in Row: 2", thin to 6-8" apart
Height at Maturity: plants reach 7' tall
Length at Maturity: 3”

Peppers

PEP-08 Yellow Peru Pepper

 

Item Details: Organic. Hot. Fruity, sweet, and citrus-y flavor. Finger shaped fruits. The piercing heat of this late-maturing pepper is worth the wait, and its deliciously fruity, sweet, and citrus-y flavor and excellent crunch only add to its enjoyment. The highly branched, leafy plants produce light-yellow, finger-shaped fruits with creases and folds.

 

Instructions: Start Indoors: 8 weeks before last frost. Sow seeds indoors ¼" deep. Peppers germinate best in warm soil, so gentle bottom heat may be helpful until seedlings emerge. Wait to transplant outdoors until soil is warm.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Distance between Plants: 12-24"
Days to Maturity: 100-120
Height at Maturity: 3’
Length at Maturity: 3-3 ½”

Tomatoes

TOM-31 Pink Berkeley Tie Dye Tomato

 

Item Details: Deep red polychrome beefsteak with metallic green stripes. Rich, earthy, luscious heirloom flavor. Nice and juicy. Fruits are usually bi-lobed. They have an engaging tanginess, almost as if lightly salted. The spiciness is just what you might expect from this striped beauty. One of the coolest tomatoes you will ever see! Reminds us of rainbow tie-dyes from the sixties. Perfect on any burger from Portabella mushroom to grass-fed beef. This is a great new introduction by Bradley Gates, organic farmer and tomato breeder of Wild Boar Farms in Napa Valley, CA. Bradley says he has been working for over 10 years to breed “the most outrageous tomatoes on the planet”. Plants are indeterminate and have good productivity. Bush variety.

 

Instructions: Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil. To prevent blight, keep foliage dry. Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses. Does not need pruning.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing Apart: 18"
Days to Maturity: 75-85
Height at Maturity: Grow with or without support.
Fruit Size: 8-12 oz

TOM-22 Brandywine, Pink Tomato (Turtle Tree Strain)

 

Item Details: For many years we have been in search of a Brandywine that is vigorous and prolific and we found it! This Pink Brandywine yields large quantities of large, pink beefsteak tomatoes with very good flavor. This strain was re-selected by Turtle Tree Seed in 2007 and we thank them for their work! Juicy fruits have excellent texture. Compare it to Sudduth’s Brandywine and see which you like better! Like all Brandywines, it cracks easily but it’s worth it.

 

Instructions: Give the plants a little bit of TLC to prevent disease and cracking, and they will reward you with luscious fruit. Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85° (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil (with lots of compost or decomposed manure). Tomatoes are susceptible to several fungal diseases (including Early and Late Blight and Verticillium Wilt). To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses. Crop rotation is also key to preventing tomato diseases. Ideally, plant tomato plants in a spot that has not had any Solanaceae crops (tomato, peppers, eggplant, potatoes) growing there for 4 years. Frequent watering will help to minimize cracking of tomatoes. Plants are potato-leaved. Harvest when fully pink-red and fruit is somewhat soft when squeezed but before they crack or begin to rot on the vine.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Space Apart: 18"
Days to Maturity: 90 from transplant
Height at Maturity: Tall. Stake plants
Weight at Maturity: Up to 1.5 lbs

TOM-21 Brandywine Tomato (Sudduth's Strain)

 

Item Details: This Brandywine strain is THE quintessential heirloom tomato that brought heirlooms to fame. Large, pink, juicy beefsteak with exquisite flavor and many folks will agree that, hands down, it is the best tasting tomato around. obtained by tomato collector Ben Quisenberry of Big Tomato Gardens from Dorris Sudduth Hill, whose family grew it in Tennessee for over 100 years.. Brandywine's mouthwatering flavor is a perfect balance of salty, tart and sweet flavors. Great for Caprese or a more common leafy salad. Roast it with a pinch of salt and a drizzle of olive oil. 
 
Instructions: Give the plants a little bit of TLC to prevent disease and cracking, and they will reward you with luscious fruit. Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil (with lots of compost or decomposed manure). Tomatoes are susceptible to several fungal diseases (including Early and Late Blight and Verticillium Wilt). To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses. Crop rotation is also key to preventing tomato diseases. Ideally, plant tomato plants in a spot that has not had any Solanaceae crops (tomato, peppers, eggplant, potatoes) growing there for 4 years. Frequent watering will help to minimize cracking of tomatoes. Plants are potato-leaved. Harvest when fully pink-red and fruit is somewhat soft when squeezed but before they crack or begin to rot on the vine.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 7-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Space Apart: 24-36"
Days to Maturity: 90 from transplant
Height at Maturity: Tall. Stake plants
Weight at Maturity: Up to 1.5 lbs

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TOM-01 Cherokee Purple Tomato

 

Item Details: Introduced by North Carolina SSE member Craig LeHoullier in 1991 from seed obtained from J. D. Green of Tennessee. Uniquely colored dusty rose-brown fruits weigh up to 12 ounces. Delicious sweet flesh. Indeterminate, 75-90 days from transplant.

 

Instructions: Sow seeds indoors ¼" deep. Tomatoes are sensitive to freezing temperatures, so wait to transplant outdoors until the soil is warm. Plant in full sun.  Support with a cage, stake or trellis

 

Days to Germination: 7-14
Days to Maturity: 75-90
Spacing Between Rows: 24-36"

TOM-30 Black Cherry Tomato

 

Item Details: Cherry tomato with delicious, complex flavor that is sweet, juicy, rich, and savory. Black Cherry was the winner of our 2017 trial of dark colored, cherry tomatoes. We were searching for a cherry tomato with the flavor of a full-size heirloom beefsteak, and we found it! Our strain is an heirloom from the Hall family (Hall’s Heritage Horticulture), grown for over two decades in Owosso, Michigan. We first received our seeds from Jim Wyant of Indiana. Before being passed down through the Hall family, Black Cherry was bred by Vince Sapp, the deceased husband of Linda Sapp, owner of Tomato Growers Supply. High yielding. Black Cherry is an excellent fresh-eating tomato, so try it on salads, sandwiches, or eaten straight off the plants
 
Instructions: Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil. To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses.
 
Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 7-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing Apart: 24-36"
Days to Maturity: 65-75
Height at Maturity: Stake or cage
Fruit Size: 1” diameter

TOM-29 Isbell's Golden Colossal Tomato

Item Details: Lemon-yellow fruits blush red on the bottom and boast a robust flavor with a perfect combo of sweet and tart. A winner of our 2017 Harvest Festival heirloom tasting - Mike says this is his favorite yellow tomato! Listed in the 1915 catalog of Isbell’s & Co of Jackson, Michigan just 30 miles from our Dexter farm. Plants are vigorous, so be sure the plants get tied to something sturdy. Fruits vary in shape and size from medium to large. Flesh holds together well for sandwiches, salads, and is good cooked as well. There are occasional red fruits. Common to older tomato types, fruit cracks easily so don’t leave it on the vine too long.

 

Instructions: Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85° (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil. To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun

Days to Germination: 7-14

Planting Depth: 1/4”

Spacing Apart: 18"

Days to Maturity: 85

Height at Maturity: Very tall. Stake or cage.

Fruit Size: Under 1 lb

TOM-14 German Lunchbox Tomato

 

Item Details: This heirloom was brought into the seed store a few years ago by a local gentleman who had been saving this tomato for many years. His family brought this variety to the U.S. when they immigrated here. The fruit is the size of a small egg, vibrant pink, sugar sweet, and begging to be eaten. Perfectly sized for salads or putting in the lunchbox! A favorite!

 

Instructions: Is resistant to blight. Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil. To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses.

 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing Apart: 18"
Days to Maturity: 75
Height at Maturity: Stake or cage
Fruit Size: Egg size and shape

TOM-32 Pruden's Purple Tomato

 

Item Details: Vigorous indeterminate vines with potato leaf foliage produce fruits with excellent sweet, balanced classic tomato flavor. This dark pink beefsteak tomato dates to the 19th century when “purple” was used to describe pink tomato color, long before the more recent proliferation of black and purple tomato varieties. Sometimes incorrectly listed in catalogs as being related to Brandywine, it is a comparable beefsteak type but ripens a week or two earlier and is much less finicky about growing conditions, especially less susceptible to cracking. Has some resistance to late blight. A great choice for new gardeners looking for a dependable heirloom beefsteak tomato.

 

Instructions: Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil. To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Spacing Apart: 18"
Days to Maturity: 75
Height at Maturity: Stake or cage
Fruit Size: 1 lb

TOM-23 Tasty Evergreen Tomato

 

Item Details: One of the best green-when-ripe tomatoes we’ve tried. Introduced in northwest Ohio in 1958 by Gleckler’s. Beefsteak type tomato. Skin ripens to contrasting stripes of yellow on lime green. Flesh is a sea-foam green. Plants have medium vigor and benefit from extra organic matter added to the soil. Savory, rich flavor that balances salt and tart with a hint of smokiness. Very juicy, but holds together well when sliced. Great sliced on sandwiches, crackers, or tossed in a salad. When cooked, adds a rich, distinct flavor to dishes.

 

Instructions: Give the plants a little bit of TLC to prevent disease and cracking, and they will reward you with luscious fruit. Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost. Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil (with lots of compost or decomposed manure). Tomatoes are susceptible to several fungal diseases (including Early and Late Blight and Verticillium Wilt). To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses. Crop rotation is also key to preventing tomato diseases. Ideally, plant tomato plants in a spot that has not had any Solanaceae crops (tomato, peppers, eggplant, potatoes) growing there for 4 years. Frequent watering will help to minimize cracking of tomatoes. Plants are potato-leaved. Harvest when fully pink-red and fruit is somewhat soft when squeezed but before they crack or begin to rot on the vine.
 

Sun Preference: Full sun
Days to Germination: 5-14
Planting Depth: 1/4”
Space Apart: 24-36"
Days to Maturity: 75 from transplant
Height at Maturity: Stake plants
Size at Maturity: 3-4” diameter